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11-19 August 2022

Homer’s epos of Odysseus and his journey back home to Ithaka is a tale as old as time. We all know the story that stands for the greatness of human endurance, strength and ingenuity. The mindset of never giving up and overcoming all adversity and even godly obstacles is the basis of this story, but its message is relatable to the most current of events.

With this theme, we want to highlight the journey that people embark on in the most difficult and unpredictable of circumstances in hope for a better tomorrow. Whether that journey is literal or emotional, human life is a series of journeys filled with experiences that shape our identity.

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Programme

11.08

Lost Homelands

Castle of Mytilene 20:15

Admission free

The Molyvos International Music Festival includes this year’s opening acts into the 2nd Festival of the North Aegean Region.
With the kind support of the Ephorate of Antiquities of Lesbos.
A guided tour of the archaeological sites will take place before the concert.
  • Thomas Simaku (b. 1958)
    Albanian Folk Song “My Beautiful Morea”
    Arranged for clarinet and guitar by Thomas SimakuJoaquín Rodrigo (1901-1999)
    Tres pequeñas piezas [Three Small Pieces] for Guitar Solo
    1. Ya se van los pastores [The Shepherds Are Already Leaving]
    2. Por caminos de Santiago [In the Streets of Santiago]
    3. Pequeña Sevillana [Little Sevillian]Béla Kovács (1937-2021)
    Hommage à Manuel de Falla for Clarinet SoloFranz Schubert (1797-1828)
    “Der Leiermann” [The Hurdy-Gurdy Man] from Winterreise [Winter Journey], Op. 89, D. 911
    Arranged for soprano and guitarRobert Schumann (1810-1856)
    “In der Fremde” [In a Foreign Land] from Liederkreis [Song Cycle], Op. 39
    Arranged for soprano and guitar

    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    Violin Sonata No. 3 in C Major, BWV 1005
    Arranged for guitar
    2. Fuga

    Leó Weiner (1885-1960)
    Two Movements for Clarinet and Guitar
    1. Βúsuló Juhász [The Woeful Shepherd]
    2. Csűrdöngölő [Barndance]

  • Danae Kontora soprano
    Petrit Çeku guitar
    Sebastian Manz clarinet

In this evening’s concert, works from different periods and places, each with its own style and character, bring to life a marvellous variety of musical moods. Thomas Simaku’s arrangement of My Beautiful Morea for clarinet and guitar underscores the beauty and tender nostalgia of this folksong from the Albanian community of Calabria. Joaquín Rodrigo’s Tres pequeñas piezas for guitar solo (1963) is a stylistic tour de force that evokes with its expressive immediacy the characteristic sounds of Spanish traditional music, while Béla Kovács’ virtuoso clarinet solo, written as a homage to Manuel de Falla, masterfully evokes the atmosphere we find in the work of the great Spanish composer. We are then transported through the peerless art of Franz Schubert and Robert Schumann to Romanticism’s world of introspection, reflection, and pervasive melancholy, first with “The Hurdy-Gurdy Man” (1828), the final song in Schubert’s Winterreise, his exquisite setting of poems by Wilhelm Müller, and then with “In der Fremde” (1840), the first song in Schumann’s setting of poems by Joseph von Eichendoff. The emotional gravity of Romanticism yields its place to the clarity and lofty spirituality of Johann Sebastian Bach’s music in the Fuga that follows, an arrangement for guitar of the second movement of the composer’s Violin Sonata no. 3 in C major, BWV 1005, with a subject derived from the Pentecost chorale “Komm, Ηeiliger Geist, Herre Gott” [Come, Holy Spirit, Lord God]. The Two Movements for Clarinet and Guitar by the Hungarian composer Leó Weiner bring us back to an atmosphere laden with folkloric colour with the plaintive, melancholic “Τhe Woeful Shepherd” and the buoyant Dionysian “Barndance” that concludes the programme.

Maria Theophili


Τhe Castle of Mytilene

The trace of the ancient circuit is nowadays completely obscured. Only one stretch of the ancient fortification wall is visible in short length at the east side to the shore, near the circular—nowadays slipped—tower. Evidence for the fortifications of early Christian times is also not preserved, although the large number of churches known to us certifies the commercial and residential flourishing of the city in this era. As for the fortifications of the Byzantine period, these have been sporadically preserved, embedded in later fortification walls of the Gattelusi and the Ottomans. The fortification walls of the Byzantine period are characterised by the use of large marble blocks, taken from various ancient monuments that were already in a ruinous condition.

The space occupied by the Castle of Mytilene has been a natural stronghold since ancient times because it provided control for the two harbours of the city. The peninsula was initially an island, separated from the mainland by a strait known in antiquity as “Mytilenaean Euripus”. The commute between the peninsula and the mainland was secured by bridges until the 15th century, when Euripus’ canal was naturally embanked and finally sealed.

In its present form, the castle occupying an area of approximately sixty acres consists of three enclosures. The upper one, on the southeastern edge of the fortress is considered to be the last line of defense and houses the central defense tower and a gunpowder storehouse. The middle enclosure includes buildings such as the prison, the medrese (Muslim religious school) and the tekke (Muslim mausoleum), the Byzantine cistern and the crypt complex, as well as another gunpowder storehouse. This main enclosure was accessible through two gate complexes: from the South, which is still in use as the current access to the castle, and from the West through the so-called Orta Kapu. Other two smaller gates to the North of the enclosure serve the traffic to and from the houses of the Lower Castle, the Saplitza, the hammam, and the small chapel of Agios Ioannis; these buildings encircled by the seaside fortification wall compose thus the third enclosure.

12.08

Paths of Memory

Medieval Castle of Agioi Theodoroi (Ovreokastro) 20:15

Admission free

The Molyvos International Music Festival includes this year’s opening acts into the 2nd Festival of the North Aegean Region.
With the kind support of the Ephorate of Antiquities of Lesbos.
A guided tour of the archaeological sites will take place before the concert.
  • Johann Sebastian Βach (1685-1750)
    Partita in A Minor for Flute Solo, BWV 1013
    1. Allemande
    2. Corrente
    3. Sarabande
    4. Bourrée anglaiseYannis Constantinidis (1903-1984)
    Suite on Popular Greek Melodies of the Dodecanese Islands for Violin and Piano
    1. Air de Karpathos [Air of Karpathos]
    2. Chant pastoral de Kalymnos [Pastoral Chant of Kalymnos]
    3. Chant et danse de Rhodes [Dancing Song of Rhodes]
    4. Danse de Leros [Dance of Leros]
    5. Air d’Archanguelos (Rhodes) [Air of Archanguelos (Rhodes)]
    6. Chant nuptial et danse (Sousta) de Rhodes [Dancing Wedding Song (Sousta) of Rhodes]Manolis Kalomiris (1883-1962)
    Five Preludes for Piano
    1. Molto agitato ed appassionato
    2. Andantino piacevole
    3. Appassionato con moto
    4. Quasi recitativo-Andantino quasi allegretto
    5. Leventika: Assai vivo e vigorosoGeorgios Kasassoglou (1908-1984)
    Four Greek Dances for Flute and Piano
    1. Allegretto piacevole
    2. “Frauentanz”. Poco Allegretto con espressione
    3. “Männertanz”. Maestoso
    4. Poco Allegretto (con gracia)

    César Franck (1822-1890)
    Sonata for Violin and Piano in A Major
    Αllegro con spirito
    Allegro

  • Danae Dörken, Kiveli Dörken piano
    Odysseas Tsakalidis violin
    Grigoria Papadopoulou flute

Splendid works of music by composers with roots in the Greek culture and society of Asia Minor, each rendering in its own way the colours of the rich palette of Greek musical tradition, share this evening’s programme with masterpieces of the flute and violin repertoire. The programme begins with the emblematic Partita in A minor for Flute Solo, a suite of four dances written by Johann Sebastian Bach in the early 1720s, most likely for Pierre-Gabriel Buffardin, a renowned flutist of the period. Its grandiose Allemande, galloping Corrente, stately Sarabande, and lively Bourrée anglaise make for a work of imposing technical and interpretative demands, one that has become a milestone in the repertoire for the instrument. Yannis Constantinidis’ Suite on Popular Greek Melodies of the Dodecanese Islands for Violin and Piano follows, written in 1948 and dedicated to Hara and Spyros Tombras. Folksongs from Karpathos, Kalymnos, Leros, and Rhodes are presented by the violin with warmth and clarity, while the piano provides an accompaniment at times discrete, at times more richly harmonious but always interesting.  Manolis Kalomiris’ Five Preludes for Piano, written in September and October of 1939 (“Trygitis and Agios Demetrios, 1939”  in the composer’s lovely note on the score) amply conveys the characteristic feel of its composer’s expansive Late Romantic idiom. We then hear the last Greek work in the programme, Georgios Kasassoglou’s Four Greek Dances for Flute and Piano in an arrangement by Norbert Studnitzky, with its characteristic melodies and marked rhythms. The concert concludes with the first two movements of the Sonata for Violin and Piano in A major by César Franck, an exquisite Romantic work, which following its premiere presentation in 1886 by the virtuoso violinist Eugène Ysaÿe, gained ever growing recognition to secure its place among the most important in the genre.

Maria Theofili


Ancient Antissa and its Territory

At the end of the 2nd millennium BC, Lesbos is mentioned by Homer as a single territory ruled by one king. Between 1130 and 900 BC, the Lesbian cities of Mytilene, Methymna, Antissa, Eresos, Pyrrha and Arisbe are founded as separate states. In the Αrchaic period, Antissa stands out nationwide thanks to the personality of the poet Terpander, to whom the emergence of the myth of Orpheus’ head having ended up in Antissa, where it was kept in the Sanctuary of Dionysus, is probably owed to. The cave “Spilios” or “Magaras” was identified by scholars with Orpheus’ oracle.

At the beginning of the Peloponnesian War, in 428 BC, Mytilene attacked Antissa, as well as the other cities of Lesbos, for Mytilene oligarchs to eradicate the substantial democratic share that existed in these cities. It was liberated from Spartan rule in 389 BC, during the operations of Thrasybulus on the island, and it joined the Second Athenian Alliance in 375 BC.

In Pseudo-Skylax’ last reference to the Lesbian cities of the Classical period, at around the middle of the 4th century BC, Antissa and its harbour are mentioned. The Romans destroy Antissa in 167 BC and its land is annexed by Methymna. In the first half of the 2nd century AD, Antissa is noted by geographer Claudius Ptolemy as an unwalled settlement, which apparently remained in place until the Middle Ages.

In the Byzantine period, the so-called Castle of Agioi Theodoroi was established there. The fortress was built in the time of the Gattelusi and it is known by the name of Ovreokastro or Ovriokastro. Following the destruction of the castle by the Ottomans in 1462, the settlement inhabitants move to the inner countryside, southwest of the fortress, to the site called Telonia.

In 1931 and 1932, English archaeologist Winifred Lamb excavated test trenches in the wider area of Ancient Antissa. Excavations brought to light a building consisting of two construction phases, which was attributed to an early sanctuary. The building was dated to the 9th or the 10th centuries BC. In the 8th century BC, a second arch was built on the west side, thus, the building of Antissa became elliptical and it was divided internally into four spaces with new partitions. A slab of baked soil in the middle room was interpreted by Lamb as an altar. This alteration of the Sanctuary of Antissa is important, as the masonry added in the 8th century BC constitutes the earliest dated example of Lesbian masonry.

A large amount of bucchero grey ware was discovered in the early building, such as dinoi, kraters (wine mixing bowls), lekanides (basins), phialai (libation vessels), as well as parts of bronze fibulae (brooches). A grey-coloured kantharos (drinking vessel) of the 6th century BC inscribed Eumachos. According to the excavator, Eumachos is the owner of the vessel, who also made the dedication to the sanctuary.

Within the framework of the promotion of the archeological site of Ovreokastro or Ovriokastro, the Ephorate of Antiquities of Lesbos has been carrying out since 2019 extensive works aiming at revealing the medieval Castle of Agioi Theodoroi, and underlying antiquities beneath the medieval castle that date back to the beginning of the 1st millennium BC (10th-9th century BC).

1.Both are Greek folk names for months. September is called Trygitis (Harvester) as this is the month of the grape harvest. October takes its name from the feast of Agios Demetrios on October 26th.

16.08

Return

21:00

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  • Thomas Simaku
    Albanian Folk Song “My Beautiful Morea”
    Arranged for clarinet and guitar by Thomas Simaku
  • Petrit Çeku, guitar
    Sebastian Manz, clarinet

 

  • Max Reger
    Das Agnus Dei [The lamb of God], Op. 138, No. 6 from Acht geistliche Gesänge [Eight sacred songs]
    Arranged for clarinet and string quartet by Sebastian Manz
  • Sebastian Manz, clarinet
    Clémence de Forceville, violin
    Rosanne Philippens, violin
    Sindy Mohamed, viola
    Vashti Hunter, cello

 

  • Joaquín Rodrigo
    Tres pequeñas piezas [Three small pieces] for Guitar Solo
    1. Ya se van los pastores
    2. Por caminos de Santiago
    3. Pequeña sevillana
  • Petrit Çeku, guitar 

 

  • Max Reger
    Nachtlied [Evening song] Op. 138, No. 3 from Acht geistliche Gesänge [Eight sacred songs]
    Arranged for clarinet and string quartet by Sebastian Manz
  • Sebastian Manz, clarinet
    Clémence de Forceville, violin
    Rosanne Philippens, violin
    Sindy Mohamed, viola
    Vashti Hunter, cello

 

  • Johannes Brahms
    Piano Quintet in F Minor, Op. 34
    1. Allegro non troppo
    2. Andante, un poco adagio
    3. Scherzo. Allegro-Trio
    4. Finale. Poco sostenuto-Allegro non troppo
  • Rosanne Philippens, violin
    Clémence de Forceville, violin
    Adrien La Marca, viola
    Timotheos Gavriilidis-Petrin, cello
    Kiveli Dörken, piano 
17.08

Wanderings

12:00

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  • Zoltán Kodály
    Esti dal [Evening song]
    Arranged for clarinet quintet by Sebastian Manz
  • Sebastian Manz, clarinet
    Clémence de Forceville, violin
    Rosanne Philippens, violin
    Sindy Mohamed, viola
    Vashti Hunter, cello

 

  • Sofia Gubaidulina
    Serenade for Guitar Solo 
  • Petrit Çeku, guitar 

 

  • Arcangelo Corelli
    Sonata in D Minor, Op. 5, No. 12, “La Folia” Variations
    Arranged for guitar and cello by Valter Dešpalj
  • Petrit Çeku, guitar
    Timotheos Gavriilidis-Petrin, cello

 

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Clarinet Quintet in A Major, K. 581
    1. Allegro
    2. Larghetto
    3. Menuetto
    4. Allegretto con variazioni
  • Sebastian Manz, clarinet
    Clémence de Forceville, violin
    Byol Kang, violin
    Sindy Mohamed, viola
    Vashti Hunter, cello
17.08

Trials

21:00

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  • Jean-Philippe Rameau
    Les Cyclopes from Pièces de clavecin [Works for harpsichord]
  • Kiveli Dörken, piano

 

  • Claude Debussy
    Sirènes (Sirens) from Trois nocturnes
    Arranged for piano solo by Gustave Samazeuilh
  • Danae Dörken, piano

 

  • Dmitri Shostakovich
    Two Pieces for String Octet, Op. 11
    1. Prelude
    2. Scherzo 
  • Byol Kang, violin
    Rosanne Philippens, violin
    Jonian Ilias Kadesha, violin
    Clémence de Forceville, violin
    Adrien La Marca, viola
    Sindy Mohamed, viola
    Timotheos Gavriilidis-Petrin, cello
    Benedict Klöckner, cello

 

  • Felix Mendelssohn
    String Quintet No. 2 in B-flat Major, Op. 87
    1. Allegro vivace
    2. Andante scherzando
    3. Adagio e lento
    4. Allegro molto vivace
  • Antje Weithaas, violin
    Jonian Ilias Kadesha, violin
    Sindy Mohamed, viola
    Adrien La Marca, viola
    Vashti Hunter, cello 
18.08

Young People’s Concert

Transformations

19:00

18.08

Penelope

21:00

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  • Antonio Caldara
    Come raggio di sol [Like a sunbeam]Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Sei du mein Trost [Βe my comfort], K. 391Alessandro Scarlatti
    Già il sole dal Gange [The sun over the Ganges] from L’ honestà negli amori [Honesty in love affairs]Franz  Schubert
    Gretchen am Spinnrade [Gretchen at the spinning wheel], D. 118

    Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt (Lied der Mignon) [Only he who knows longing (Mignon’s song)],
    D. 877, No. 4
  • Danae Kontora, soprano
    Danae Dörken, piano
    Kiveli Dörken, piano

 

  • Johann Kaspar Mertz
    An Malvina [To Malvina] for Guitar Solo from Bardenklänge [Bardic \ sounds], Op. 13
  • Petrit Çeku, guitar

 

  • Richard Strauss
    Die Nacht [Night], Op. 10, No. 3
    Amor [Cupid], Op. 68, No. 5
    Morgen [Tomorrow], Op. 27, No. 4Claude Debussy
    ApparitionHenri Duparc
    Lamento
    Chanson triste [Song of sadness]
  • Danae Kontora, soprano
    Danae Dörken, piano
    Kiveli Dörken, piano

 

  • Eibhlís Farrell
    Penelope Weaving for Viola Solo
  • Sindy Mohamed, viola

 

  • Attik
    Apo mesa pethamenos [Dead from the inside]Michalis Sougioul
    As erhosoun gia ligo [If you could come for a while]
  • Danae Kontora, soprano
    Danae Dörken, piano
    Kiveli Dörken, piano

 

19.08

Ithaca

21:00

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  • Franz Schubert
    Piano Trio No. 1 in B-flat Major, D. 898
    1. Allegro moderato
    2. Andante, un poco mosso
    3. Scherzo. Allegro-Trio
    4. Rondo. Allegro vivace
  • Jonian Ilias Kadesha, violin
    Benedict Klöckner, cello
    Danae Dörken, piano

 

  • Costas Mantzoros, Nickos Harizanos
    Ithaca (world premiere)
    Work for actor / narrator, string trio and prerecorded materia
    Actor / Narrator: Giorgos Giannarakos

  • Rosanne Philippens, violin
    Adrien La Marca, viola
    Benedict Klöckner, cello

 

  • Arnold Schönberg
    Verklärte Nacht [Transfigured night], Op. 4
  • Antje Weithaas, violin
    Byol Kang, violin
    Adrien La Marca, viola
    Sindy Mohamed, viola
    Benedict Klöckner, cello
    Timotheos Gavriilidis-Petrin, cello

Molyvos International Music Festival

Striking the right note – Spreading the music 

The Molyvos International Music Festival (MIMF) is a unique project in the North Aegean region, bringing together the greatest international young talents for a celebration of world-class classical music. Fusing exciting rising-stars alongside the biggest names in classical music, MIMF rises as Greece’s most prestigious classical music event and one of Europe’s idyllic chamber music festivals.

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With a huge thanks to our festival partners